How to Handle the Middle Aged Hoax

By | March 22, 2015

My favorite and most valued gift by the aging process is a great big case of the “Fuck Its”.

At 15, 20 and even into my thirties there was a great deal of energy put into what people thought of me and adjusting my life and thinking to accommodate the ubiquitous “them”.

While everyone commented on how “nice” (the original definition of this word was “dumb”) and pleasant I was, there was much upset and resentment waiting to be(unleashed). Creating a false persona allowed me to keep the secret (my being gay)hidden.

Being nice and not a problem, I could live and exist happily undetected.

This thinking kept me trapped in awful relationships and heinous partnerships.

People love it when you are eager to accommodate, cosign bullshit and engage in all manner of tom foolery. When I began fighting my way out of Mr. Nice Gay mode, folks looked at me with disbelief and many feigned shock.

When a person in a relationship makes a drastic change, all parties are affected, have reactions and feelings and ultimately must make some adjustment.

Nobody wants to adjust if their needs are constantly being met.

The ability to not give a fuck is a great section of the aging process.

When I say not giving a shit, it doesn’t mean being an asshole which is a role people will attempt to assign you. The not-giving- a- shit means: I will not twist myself into a pretzel in an effort to get folks to like or accept me. It also means I will not hand over my thinking , self esteem or self validation to another and hope they come up with something grand.

Whenever I’ve handed over the reins of my life to someone, I have never been happy with the results.

When I’ve co-directed an initiative, my joy increased as a result of consistent and deliberate actions. As we age, there is less tolerance for foolishness and shenanigans with people that have no grand vision for their lives and whose concern in life is getting by with the least amount of intellectual or spiritual effort.

As I’ve aged, I have constantly and shamelessly asked myself : Is this activity something I want to engage in or invest my energy into ?

Is this the best use of my time?

Part of the aging process deals with the comfortability and brilliance that occurs when we make a decision to be bold.

You can’t be bold if your primary concern is hurting someone’s feelings or what they will think of you. There is really nothing better than making choices from a well thought out and guiltless position.

Aging has forced me to spend a whole lot less time being concerned with the opinions of others and most importantly, how I look to them.

Letting go of the crazed production that is “image” is also wonderful.

If I’m tired, I rest.

If I’m pissed off, hurt or confused, I can choose how I will address these issues with my husband, friends and coworkers. Sometimes a great big box of “shut the hell up” is required.

At other times, it is important to speak out and up and opt for deliberate and swift action.

My younger self had the need to constantly and psychotically remain busy at all costs.

Brene Brown says this is the new addiction: Staying busy so that we don’t have to deal with the realities/truth of our lives.

I encourage all of you to embrace growing older.

Those of us who are most affected by this need to be “nice” (gays, women and minorities) should purposely and gladly welcome the attitude and power that comes from aging, being clear and the natural outcome that this provides.

If we have spent lives of dire desperation, anxiously awaiting for someone to give us permission to dream and accomplish heart passions, then the aging process can look pretty crappy.

There is nothing to dread or lament if we have lived lives of meaning and exploration that have allowed thinking, spirituality and self knowledge to grow.

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